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Professor Stork

Professor Stork

Back to school!

Summer’s winding down and the time has come for the entire family to embrace the coming school year. While the summer was full of great times and adventures, most parents, preschool and elementary school children are looking forward to the start of another great school year.
The question I’m sure you’re asking yourself is, are you as prepared as you can possibly be to get your children off to a great start this school year? Whether you’re a primary parent, co-parenting, or a caregiver you’ve done everything you can to make sure your child is ready to go. You’ve gotten them the supplies they need and focused on getting get them into the positive frame of mind that will get the year off to a great start.
But what about you? Have you thought about doing things a bit differently this year to make sure this coming school year exceeds your, and your child’s expectations – to help take your child’s education to the next level?
Here are some simple one-on-one and family activities you can regularly schedule that will give your child a significant boost all year long:
  1. Sit down with your child, and a calendar, and share their upcoming schedule, Including school hours, after school care, and extracurricular activities. This simple activity will help make them comfortable and excited about the coming year.
  2. Write a note to your child’s teacher every month or two thanking him or her for something they did for your child, or just to let them know your child is enjoying the class. It’s a great way to get your child a bit of extra positive attention in class. It’s also something your child’s teacher will appreciate. In recent years much of the communication teachers receive from parents is negative so a positive note can go a long way.
  3. Keep visible track of accomplishments your child achieves during the year. For example, make a nice bright wall board showing each book your child reads during the year, or showing a list of athletic skills your child has mastered. With so much emphasis put on test scores and corrected work, it’s nice to show your child that you emphasize his or her positive achievements. As the list grows your child will be proud to see he or she is accomplishing a great deal in school.
  4. Take your child on a weekly one on one 15-minute walk around the block or in the park. Your primary responsibility on these walks is to listen. Let your child talk about school or anything else going on in their lives. What might be awkward in week one will over time turn into the best fifteen minutes in the week for both you and your child. It’s so easy for one-on-one time to get lost in the insanity of daily living.
These are just a few ideas. Come up with some others of your own. There are many things you can do that won’t take a lot of time to help your child have a wonderful year in school.
P.S.

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